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AOS interview experience – Newark NJ

AOS interview experience – Newark NJ

I successfully adjusted status yesterday, so I thought I’d share my interview experience. My interview was scheduled for 10am, and we arrived at about 9:30. The USCIS building is at Broad St. in Newark and the parking is behind the building. For AOS interviews you use the side entrance on Walnut Street, so that is where we headed.

I successfully adjusted status yesterday, so I thought I’d share my interview experience.

My interview was scheduled for 10am, and we arrived at about 9:30. The USCIS building is at Broad St. in Newark and the parking is behind the building. For AOS interviews you use the side entrance on Walnut Street, so that is where we headed.

Once we got there we were confronted by a massive line. Our attorney was with us and she even commented that she had never seen anything like it. So we took our place in line and had to wait for around 45 minutes before we could even enter the building, (missing our given appointment time).

The lobby areas before the X-ray machine and metal detectors are quite small, so they only let 14 people in at a time. The security guard welcomed everybody as a group, and gave a small security briefing before asking everybody to move metallic objects into their outer coats and put them through the X-ray machine, along with any bags. Then one by one, we proceeded through the metal detector.

The elevators are straight ahead, which we took to the 13th floor. We then proceeded to room 13, and handed in our appointment notice at window 2, (which was for AOS appointments). The lady taking the notices at that window was asking people if they had attorneys with them as they gave her the notices. I don’t know why she asked this, as the people who did have their attorneys didn’t seem to be getting seen any faster. The waiting area was very crowded, (my attorney again commented that she had never seen it this bad).

I was wearing a suit, while many people just dressed casually. Best advice is to wear what you feel comfortable in. For an important interview, I feel more comfortable wearing a suit, than say, jeans and a sweater.

We took our seats and were eventually called just before 12pm. The officer apologised about the wait and said that he had only received our case at 11:45, even though it was a 10am appointment. He led us into the interview area which did not consist of separate offices. It was more of an open plan office/cubicle farm or whatever you want to call it, so when we were being interviewed, we could actually hear other AOS interviews going on around us.

We all sat down, and my wife and I had to raise our right hands and swear to tell the truth. The officer then asked for my passport, and my wife’s drivers license. He removed the I-94 from the passport and then proceeded with the interview. He was actually quite a pleasant guy, and first thing he asked was if I had enjoyed my time in the USA so far. Then he went on to the questions that I had answered on form I-485, asking if I had any drug/alcohol problems, and if I had participated in any terrorist organisations. I smiled when he asked that one, and the guy looked embarrassed and said "sorry, I do have to ask these things." He then confirmed that we were both living at the same address and asked for proof of our relationship. We gave him bank statements, our lease, car insurance documents, and a letter from our credit card company saying that I was a joint account holder.

{mosbanner right}Things that he did not ask for, but we had with us anyway: birth certificates, my wife’s passport, our marriage certificate, our medical results, my wife’s tax returns, our bank letter, letters from our employers and pay stubs, USCIS documents, (e.g. NOA’s), photographs from our wedding etc. The officer then asked if I had ever left the USA while adjusting status, to which I answered no. He then said that he was approving our case, he took my EAD, (but not my advance parole papers -I still have them) and stamped my passport. He told us that I would receive my green card in 2-3 weeks and that it would be a conditional green card as we had only been married for 9 months. He gave us a slip of paper with advice on what to do when the time came to remove conditions.

Overall the interview took less than 5 minutes. My attorney later told us that she had dealt with this officer before and she knows that he actually takes the time to read the cases thoroughly before the interview, to make the interview itself run more efficiently. So we thanked him, and he showed us the way to the exit.