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Fail To Prepare, Prepare To Fail

Fail To Prepare, Prepare To Fail

I believe that you’re more likely to make a success of your life in Canada if you, and your, situation are based around a set of guidelines. I should caveat what comes next with the realisation that these are my own desirables, specific to my own situation, and therefore they will not necessarily be achievable (or required) for everyone.

I believe that you’re more likely to make a success of your life in Canada if you, and your, situation are based around a set of guidelines. I should caveat what comes next with the realisation that these are my own desirables, specific to my own situation, and therefore they will not necessarily be achievable (or required) for everyone:

THE PRELIMS

1. Arranged employment in a recognised field.
If you were a farrier living in Cornwall, would you up sticks and move to the centre of Birmingham and hope to find the work flooding in? Why then do you expect to be able to do that when you move to Canada?

2. Financial security.
I guess it’s pretty self explanatory that equity is going to make life much easier, especially in the outset before you’ve become established. No doubt it will help if you’re the type of person that can live to their means too. I doubt that personal loans and credit cards will be thrown at you when you arrive in Canada (not at first anyway), so if you’re the typical UK “˜maxed out – minimum payment’ credit card consumer then I would have a long hard think.

3. Open mindedness.
You’re not in the UK anymore, even if everyone does speak English. If you want rolling countryside, real ale, village pubs, decent bacon etc, then stay where you are. You’re in a foreign country, embrace the culture (what there is of it), speak to the people (don’t wait for them to speak to you), go with the flow and don’t try and swim against it. You’ll only end up failing and annoying everyone in the process.

4. Discontentment with the UK.
If you love your life in the UK then you’re probably wasting you time moving – enough said.

5. Independence, i.e. not tied to family, friends, social circles etc.

  • Sunday lunch with Mum & Dad every weekend?
  • You’re the nieces and nephews favourite “˜Uncle Pete’ and you know all their birthdays?
  • It’s your turn to host the weekly dinner party for your extensive circle of friends?
  • You get homesick and ring your wife 8 times when you have to stay overnight in a hotel with your work?
  • If you see yourself in any of the above, then unpack your bags now. Watch an episode of 'Wanted Down Under,' you'll soon see what I mean.
  • Thorough research.

Believe it or not there’s more to a PC than Facebook. If you haven’t spent months on end researching and emailing about property, jobs, community, shopping, laws, medical, tax etc etc then you don’t know enough and about what you’re getting yourself into. You final decisions should be a series of “˜down selects’, not merely a wet finger in the air. Following that, a physical visit to where you intend to settle would be a must in my opinion. You never know where the enemy may be hiding?

6. Willpower/Motivation.
Definitely desirable, if not essential. If you’re the type of person that drives to the shop 300yds down the road, then the problems that you will undoubtedly encounter along the way will by far exceed your level of drive and ability to cope with them.

7. Realistic expectations.

  • Housing isn’t “˜cheap,’ it’s just less expensive than the UK.
  • Food isn’t as cheap as Tesco’s and you’re unlikely to get the same choice either.
  • Wages are likely to be lower in terms of like-for-like jobs.
  • Some people are friendly, some are not.
  • Some areas have low crime, some do not (see point 6 above).

I could go on but no doubt I’ve bored you all to death already. Like I said previously, this is only my interpretation of a prerequisite “˜tick list’ to success. It’s not exhaustive and it’s only my own opinion. You may do/have all these things and still decide you hate Canada and it’s not the place for you. That said, I still think it’s better to do your reconnaissance and to have a clear plan on how you’re going to succeed. However, nothing in life is guaranteed and as we say in the Army, “˜the best laid plans rarely survives first contact with the enemy,’ so make sure you have a contingency for withdrawal.

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Author: British Expats Member "joepublic"

©British Expats and "joepublic"